Energy sources – Energy Tower http://energytower.org/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 18:04:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://energytower.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-03T174243.577.png Energy sources – Energy Tower http://energytower.org/ 32 32 City of Joburg recommits to research into alternative energy sources – SABC News https://energytower.org/city-of-joburg-recommits-to-research-into-alternative-energy-sources-sabc-news/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 05:01:32 +0000 https://energytower.org/city-of-joburg-recommits-to-research-into-alternative-energy-sources-sabc-news/ The City of Joburg has re-committed to finding alternative energy sources, in addition to Eskom, as quickly as possible. Metro says this will help ensure that services such as water supply, health care and sewage are not affected by power outages. Residents of Bosmont, parts of Riverlea and surrounding areas have been without power since […]]]>

The City of Joburg has re-committed to finding alternative energy sources, in addition to Eskom, as quickly as possible.

Metro says this will help ensure that services such as water supply, health care and sewage are not affected by power outages.

Residents of Bosmont, parts of Riverlea and surrounding areas have been without power since Saturday following an explosion at the Industria power plant following the power outages.

Residents of Roodepoort were also affected by the theft of cables from their substation during power cuts.

MMC of the city of Joburg for infrastructure, Michael Sun says: “The cables were cut during the load shedding. So when you have that kind of damage, it inevitably damages the water supply for residents in the area. We can’t sit back and say we can’t do anything. We are looking at ongoing projects where we install an alternative power supply to the pump stations so that whenever there is load shedding these pump stations can still operate. »

Fifth stage

Eskom is set to continue Wednesday with stage five blackouts. He says he could get them down to stage four by Thursday.

President Cyril Ramaphosa has returned home after cutting short his international trip amid the country’s escalating energy crisis.

Research expert Dr. Sean Muller says lack of accountability is the biggest problem affecting the electric utility.

This follows accelerated stages of power cuts, which reached stage six over the weekend.

Muller says there is a possibility of sabotage of Eskom’s infrastructure but adds that it is difficult to prove.

“The bigger question is about liability, because if Eskom can always blame sabotage, even if it’s not proven, they can always blame disgruntled individuals. So how the hell are we going to get improvements, how are we going to hold Eskom’s management, or Eskom’s Board of Directors, accountable, while they are still allowed to make these excuses, and often without any definitive proof.

VIDEO: Eskom briefs the media on current system challenges

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Balkan states are slowly starting to harness their vast renewable energy sources in hopes of clean and abundant heat and power | European | News and current affairs from across the continent | DW https://energytower.org/balkan-states-are-slowly-starting-to-harness-their-vast-renewable-energy-sources-in-hopes-of-clean-and-abundant-heat-and-power-european-news-and-current-affairs-from-across-the-continent-dw/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 14:47:11 +0000 https://energytower.org/balkan-states-are-slowly-starting-to-harness-their-vast-renewable-energy-sources-in-hopes-of-clean-and-abundant-heat-and-power-european-news-and-current-affairs-from-across-the-continent-dw/ South-eastern Europe has the potential to be a Shangri-la for carbon-free energy sources, especially for solar, wind and bioenergy. One expert study after another confirm that the region’s long hours of sunshine, gusty coastlines and mountain ranges, and immense biomass resources provide exceptional conditions for a thriving renewable energy sector. The benefits of a clean […]]]>

South-eastern Europe has the potential to be a Shangri-la for carbon-free energy sources, especially for solar, wind and bioenergy. One expert study after another confirm that the region’s long hours of sunshine, gusty coastlines and mountain ranges, and immense biomass resources provide exceptional conditions for a thriving renewable energy sector.

The benefits of a clean energy revolution would be a huge boon for the region. Since wind and solar are now by far the cheapest sources of energy, many billions of euros could be saved in energy costs and additional billions accrued in other benefits, such as an air purer, which would improve people’s health.

The International Renewable Energy Agency, for example, estimates that by harnessing solar and wind power, this corner of Europe has the potential to produce 739 gigawatts of green energy. This is as much as 739 medium-sized nuclear reactors produce in one year and more than three times the electricity currently consumed by Albania and the countries of the former Yugoslavia. In short, there is enormous export potential in harnessing the natural energy wealth of these countries, all of which currently import electricity.

Moreover, energy systems running on locally produced energy would bolster local incomes rather than the books of distant multinationals, and a modern and resilient regional energy system would greatly improve the security of energy supply – long a pet peeve in the Balkans. Last but not least, although the region is not a top emissions sinker, it is now part of European efforts to reduce greenhouse gases and meet international climate targets.

A basis for transformation

So why are the Balkan countries currently importing expensive fossil fuels and burning the coal and forest timber they extract from their own territories? This is exactly the question that we – Deutsche Welle, a group of leading journalists from the region and myself – set out to answer. Journalismfund.eu, a Brussels-based grants program, offered to help us investigate the energy sectors in Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, North Macedonia and Serbia. The product consisted of five multimedia reports that revealed similar obstacles in the five countries, but also anomalies unique to each specific country.

Wind turbines and a biogas plant stand out against the setting sun, near Ebendorf, Lower Saxony, Germany, June 12, 2012

The International Renewable Energy Agency estimates this corner of Europe could produce 739 gigawatts of green energy

On the positive side, one thing the five countries had in common was the breakthroughs in legislation that in recent years have opened up their energy markets to clean energy producers. This legislation has taken years to develop and, while not flawless, as our reports on Serbia and Bosnia clearly show, it is a starting point for transformation.

Progress is underway

In Albania, Kosovo, Montenegro and North Macedonia, new power exchanges are opening that will provide the short-term integrated markets needed to absorb large volumes of intermittent renewables.

Workers loading coal onto a truck at a coal warehouse in Nis, Serbia

“There is profit and power in the status quo: in the persistence of coal in Bosnia and Herzegovina, hydroelectricity in Albania, and oil and gas elsewhere,” writes Paul Hockenos.

Nevertheless, unless the region’s political and economic elites wholeheartedly buy into the logic of renewable energy – which is not currently the case – the region’s markets will remain favorable to fossil fuels and hydroelectricity. , a renewable energy that is already abundant there, for years to come.

Deployment blocked by conservative actors

Indeed, the links between energy producers and the state in the region go back a long way, namely to the socialist era, and persist to this day. There is profit and power in the status quo: in the persistence of coal in Bosnia and Herzegovina, hydroelectric power in Albania, and oil and gas elsewhere.

Solar panels on the roof of the Maricic family house in Ruma, northern Serbia

The Maricic family in Ruma, northern Serbia, wanted to harness the sun’s energy and installed solar panels on the roof of their house, but quickly found that things weren’t as simple or cost effective as they were. they had foreseen it.

Deeply conservative actors involved in these sectors have so far blocked the deployment of solar and wind energy and continue to throw obstacles in the way wherever they can. This is why the Maricic family in Ruma, Serbia, encountered such difficulties in producing solar energy on the roof of their house, as reported by Sanja Kjaljic.

Timid first steps towards renewable energies

In Albania, offshore and onshore wind energy developers were until recently completely held back. Elona Elezi reports that the very first wind turbines are going up in the far north of Albania. Others will follow, but until the market and a modern, responsive grid – a troublesome problem throughout the region – are up and running, the development of the wind energy sector will be slow and erratic.

Solar panels on the roof of a building

According to experts, North Macedonia could become energy independent, if only 1% of the country’s territory were equipped with solar panels

One of the factors likely to propel renewable energy in the region is soaring fossil fuel prices, which makes clean energy investments all the more quickly profitable.

International involvement

In addition, due to international efforts to tackle the climate crisis, the international community has become involved, above all the EU and its Member States, which are providing assistance in the form of the energy community and projects such as the biomass plant in Kosovo mentioned by Vjosa Cerkini.

Perhaps the determining factor will be the budding popular enthusiasm. There is a demand for clean and cheap renewable energy, DW correspondents report. This is increasingly evident on the ground, as citizens of the region not only become aware of the vast potential of clean energy sources in their region, but also gain insight into what others are doing elsewhere and what that they miss.

This the text is the opening of a series of five articles on the development of renewable energies in South-Eastern Europe conducted with the Support of journalismfund.eu. Please find the articles and videos hyperlinked in the text above.

Edited by Rüdiger Rossig and Aingeal Flanagan

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The association wants the diversification of Nigeria’s energy sources https://energytower.org/the-association-wants-the-diversification-of-nigerias-energy-sources/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 22:38:41 +0000 https://energytower.org/the-association-wants-the-diversification-of-nigerias-energy-sources/ By Sylvester Thompson The Association of Professional Women Engineers of Nigeria (APWEN) says electricity problems can be solved if Nigeria’s energy sources in the domestic, commercial and industrial sectors are diversified. Elizabeth Sterigho, President of APWEN, made the revelation during a press briefing to announce the start of the association’s four-day conference in Abuja on […]]]>

By Sylvester Thompson

The Association of Professional Women Engineers of Nigeria (APWEN) says electricity problems can be solved if Nigeria’s energy sources in the domestic, commercial and industrial sectors are diversified.

Elizabeth Sterigho, President of APWEN, made the revelation during a press briefing to announce the start of the association’s four-day conference in Abuja on Monday.

Sterigho said the government should also embrace new technologies available to reduce energy waste and cut costs.

She noted that the association is focusing on the issue as a player in the implementation of the federal government’s energy transition plan.

“The federal government’s plan announces new opportunities for solar energy companies to obtain results-based financing from the Universal Energy Facility.

APWEN members at Monday’s event.

“Therefore, as women engineers, justice on the theme will empower individuals, especially companies, to know how to integrate the transition plan,” she said.

According to her, this will make the most of Nigeria’s technology investments in providing modern and sustainable energy.

The President of APWEN revealed that the theme of their 2022 conference is: “JUST Energy Transition: An Enabler for Sustainable Development in Nigeria”.

“A JUST energy transition is a transition to a sustainable, low-carbon and equitable energy system that aims to improve people’s lives and preserve the environment,” she said.

Sterigho said access to clean and modern energy services was a huge challenge for the African continent, especially Nigeria, saying energy was fundamental for socio-economic development and poverty eradication.

She maintained that in Nigeria, the electricity sector had been in a coma for many years, coupled with the frequent collapse of the national grid.

She added that Nigeria’s energy source is non-renewable resulting in high carbon content and environmental pollution.

She underlined that the transition of the energy sector would require significant investments.

She said Nigeria should not be left behind as traditional fossil fuel exporting countries seek to take advantage of changing demand patterns brought about by the energy transition and decarbonize their economies.

The APWEN President said this may be why Nigeria has launched an energy transition plan, aimed at boosting investment in the development of energy projects in order to tackle growing energy poverty and d ensure sustainability.

“The plan calls for Nigeria to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all of its 200 million people by 2030.

“It would also help achieve net zero by 2060, through massive investment in oil, gas, solar power and other modern energy technologies, such as hydrocarbons and electric vehicles,” said she declared.

The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that APWEN is a division of the Nigerian Society of Engineers (NSE). (NAN) (www.nannews.ng)

Edited by Olabisi Akinbode/Julius Toba-Jegede

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The proliferating deployment of renewable energy sources is fueling growth https://energytower.org/the-proliferating-deployment-of-renewable-energy-sources-is-fueling-growth/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 12:38:00 +0000 https://energytower.org/the-proliferating-deployment-of-renewable-energy-sources-is-fueling-growth/ company logo Global Green Hydrogen Market Global Green Hydrogen Market Dublin, Sept. 16, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “Analysis Report of the Green Hydrogen Market Size, Share, and Trends by Technology (PEM Electrolyzer, Alkaline Electrolyzer), by Application (Power Generation, Transportation), by Distribution Channel, by Region and Segment Forecast, 2022-2030” report has been added to from […]]]>

company logo

Global Green Hydrogen Market

Global Green Hydrogen Market

Global Green Hydrogen Market

Dublin, Sept. 16, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “Analysis Report of the Green Hydrogen Market Size, Share, and Trends by Technology (PEM Electrolyzer, Alkaline Electrolyzer), by Application (Power Generation, Transportation), by Distribution Channel, by Region and Segment Forecast, 2022-2030” report has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The global green hydrogen market size is expected to reach USD 60.56 billion by 2030, according to this report. The market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 39.5% from 2022 to 2030. Growing government investments and subsidies benefiting the use of clean fuels, as well as the hydrogen economy touted as an environmentally friendly alternative environment to the fossil fuel economy, are expected to strengthen demand over the forecast period.

The market is driven by the proliferating deployment of renewable energy sources in various end-use industries. Green hydrogen is produced by electrolysis of water, with renewable energy generation sources such as wind power, solar power and other renewable energy sources. Furthermore, it is estimated that the growing scale of renewable energy will drive down the cost of clean energy generation, thereby positively influencing the growth of the market over the forecast years.

The alkaline electrolyzer segment accounted for 66.18% of the market in 2021 as it is the conventional electrolyzer technology used in green hydrogen projects. The alkaline electrolyzer uses the liquid alkaline solution of potassium or sodium hydroxide as the electrolyte and it has higher operating hours than PEM electrolyzers. However, PEM electrolyzers are expected to witness a higher growth rate than alkaline electrolyzers over the forecast period.

The transportation segment was the largest in the application segmentation, accounting for around 40.61% of the global green hydrogen market in 2021 segment during the forecast period. The power generation segment is also expected to grow at a steady pace owing to the reduction in green hydrogen production costs.

The pipeline segment in the distribution channel accounted for 63.11% of the market in 2021. A pipeline is the most economically viable method for transporting large volumes over long distances. Cargo segmentation is expected to grow at a CAGR of 40.9% over the forecast period due to increased demand for green hydrogen.

The market in North America is expected to achieve a significant growth rate over the forecast period, with the United States and Canada leading the region due to the implementation of clean energy policies. In the United States, California holds the majority of market share with growth driven by aggressive decarbonization goals, such as phasing out gasoline or diesel public buses by 2040.

Major industry players are focusing on innovation and technological advancements to reduce the high cost of electrolyser units, thereby boosting the commercialization of green hydrogen production. Additionally, market players are emphasizing on practicing several strategic initiatives such as joint ventures, partnerships, mergers & acquisitions and others to strengthen their market presence in the coming years.

Countries realizing their untapped potential in hydrogen markets are expected to improve the industry landscape over the coming years. In October 2019, Siemens announced a technical partnership on a 5 GW combined wind and solar power project in Australia. The company is expected to provide its electrolyser technology to generate green hydrogen through electrolysis from renewable energy. The clean hydrogen produced is intended for export to Asian markets.

Market dynamics

Market factors

Market constraints

Main topics covered:

Chapter 1 Methodology and Scope

Chapter 2 Executive Summary

Chapter 3 Market Variables, Trends and Scope

Chapter 4 Green Hydrogen Market: Technology Movement Analysis, 2021 & 2030

Chapter 5 Green Hydrogen Market: Application Movement Analysis, 2021 & 2030

Chapter 6 Green Hydrogen Market: Distribution Channel Movement Analysis, 2021 & 2030

Chapter 7 Green Hydrogen Market: Regional Estimates and Trend Analysis

Chapter 8 Green Hydrogen Market: Hydrogen Fueling Stations

Chapter 9 Green Hydrogen Market – Competitive Landscape

Chapter 10 Business Profiles

Companies cited

For more information on this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/vflxus

About ResearchAndMarkets.com
ResearchAndMarkets.com is the world’s leading source for international market research reports and market data. We provide you with the latest data on international and regional markets, key industries, top companies, new products and the latest trends.

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CONTACT: CONTACT: ResearchAndMarkets.com Laura Wood,Senior Press Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470 For U.S./ CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900
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Here’s How Intermittent and Firm Renewable Sources Are Factored Into Hawaii’s Power Grid https://energytower.org/heres-how-intermittent-and-firm-renewable-sources-are-factored-into-hawaiis-power-grid/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 22:17:00 +0000 https://energytower.org/heres-how-intermittent-and-firm-renewable-sources-are-factored-into-hawaiis-power-grid/ Hawaiian Electric is looking to bring more firm renewable energy to the grid over the next decade. But as new solar and storage projects come online, the definition and role of enterprise generation remains up for debate. On Oʻahu, Kapolei Energy Storage by Plus Power is still under construction, but it will be the largest […]]]>

Hawaiian Electric is looking to bring more firm renewable energy to the grid over the next decade. But as new solar and storage projects come online, the definition and role of enterprise generation remains up for debate.

On Oʻahu, Kapolei Energy Storage by Plus Power is still under construction, but it will be the largest storage facility in the state when completed, according to Polly Shaw, director of policy and communications for Plus Power.

“This large-scale Kapolei energy storage facility will provide great absorption of midday solar energy to be ready when the evening peak arrives,” she told HPR.

Battery storage is an important piece of the energy puzzle because it adds stability to variable energy sources, like wind and solar. Traditionally, these resources provided power only when the wind was blowing or the sun was shining.

Renewables generally fall into two camps: intermittent or firm. Intermittent sources such as solar and wind are weather dependent and energy limited. Firm sources can produce electricity 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, whenever needed.

The waste-powered H-POWER on Oʻahu is considered a renewable business, under state law, as would a biomass, biodiesel, or geothermal power plant. But storage technology like Kapolei Energy Storage complicates these definitions.

Savannah Harriman Mate

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HPR

The Kapolei Energy Storage facility is expected to be completed by spring 2023.

“Battery plus solar is a pretty reliable resource. If you just bought a battery, well, it’s not renewable at all. But if you’re going to power it with solar, and solar plus batteries, is it a renewable business? Well, that depends on your definition,” said Matthias Fripp, associate professor of electrical engineering at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa.

He also serves on the technical advisory board for Hawaiian Electric’s integrated grid planning process. Fripp pushes any hard line in the sand between what is and isn’t a renewable business.

“I would say there’s no clear definition. Every time someone comes to you using that kind of terminology – firm, revolving – you have to dig a little deeper and ask how they define it?” Fripp said.

Hawaiian Electric argues that solar and wind paired with battery storage don’t meet its definition firm power. This year, HECO launched the tender for 500 to 700 megawatts of next-generation farm on Oʻahu.

“Storage is typically limited to about four hours and that’s what we’re looking for in our RFP,” said Rebecca Dayhuff-Matsushima, vice president of resource procurement at Hawaiian Electric. “Long-term storage, things that would last for days or weeks, is very expensive and still in its infancy in technology development. So there’s always this need for a 24-hour enterprise generation. and 7 days a week.”

Fripp agrees that this kind of corporate power has a role to play, but thinks people should be careful not to overestimate the power needed. Even though the main advantage of solid energy is that it can be used 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, Fripp says that it would be incredibly expensive to permanently use a new renewable energy production plant.

“I don’t even want to imagine how much energy that would cost. That would be bad. But again, if you only use it 3-5% of the year, it won’t have a big effect on invoices,” Fripp said. “If you use my definition of what they need, which is something that you can activate when you need it, but it won’t work all the time, then it seems to me that we need something like 150 megawatts.”

Unlike Hawaii’s current fossil-fuel plants, Dayhuff-Matsushima says HECO does not plan to use new, 24-hour, firm renewable plants.

“What we’re looking for is flexible, firm, renewable generation that we can ramp up and down, that we can turn off when it’s not needed, but is there when it’s needed so we can make sure that we are able to provide safe, resilient and reliable energy for the island,” she told HPR.

Solar and wind will still be in the lead, says Dayhuff-Matsushima, but enterprise generation may take over.

Clearway Energy Group's Mililani I Solar Project, Oʻahu's first large-scale solar power plant and storage solar power renewable energy

Office of Governor David Ige

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FILE – Clearway Energy Group’s large-scale solar and storage facility near Mililani on Oʻahu.

But some say Hawaiʻi has to wonder if that role can be filled by battery storage technology.

“Battery technology is already very functional, and it is improving and evolving rapidly. And battery technology can store energy from any source, including sources that are affected by weather conditions like wind and the sun. And they can turn what we normally call intermittent energy into steady energy,” said Colin Yost, chief operating officer of RevoluSun, a solar battery and battery installation company. locally owned and operated and specializing in rooftop solar.

Kapolei Energy Storage can capture solar energy during the day for use in the early hours of the night. Yost asks, why should he stop there?

“At this time, we don’t believe the batteries work 24/7. They’re generally considered a four-hour battery or some other amount of guaranteed storage,” Yost said. “When you connect thousands of batteries to a grid, some of that power may still be available 24/7.”

“So it’s really a question of scale and a question of technology and how you integrate those resources into the larger network. And that’s where I think more discussion is needed. A bit of imagination is needed in terms of how we’re really going to make it work,” he told HPR.

Dayhuff-Matsushima says the storage just isn’t there yet. If something went really wrong, like a natural disaster, companies’ traditional generation facilities could work better and deliver electricity sooner.

The introduction of new firm renewables addresses other concerns, such as the limits of the amount of land we have available for new solar and wind farms. But Dayhuff-Matsushima says solar power and storage still have an important role to play in Hawaii’s energy strategy.

“Being able to use these facilities, solar plus storage, or any type of intermittent plus storage facility, allows us to reduce the amount of firm generation we have to use. And that’s why even if we go out and we’re looking for a new generation of renewable business, we’re going to take more fossil fuel generation out of it,” Dayhuff-Matsushima said.

Firm versus intermittent is not just semantic. These definitions are important because they shape what the grid will fundamentally look like as Hawaii tries to meet its clean energy goals. Dayhuff-Matsushima says it can be a bit of a stretch trying to measure the needs of the future against today’s technologies.

“I think a lot of people think about this 2045 goal of 100% renewable energy that we’re just going to hit – like we’re going to have all these systems in place,” she said. “But really, it will be constant because the facilities that we are putting in place today with 20-year contracts will expire in 2045. These are either going to have to be renegotiated or they are going to have to be replaced.

“It will be an ever-evolving journey, like any electrical system. It’s just that we’re moving from what was traditionally an ever-evolving journey from fossil fuels to new forms of renewable technologies,” he said. she adds. “Right now we also have to plan what is available.”

Can solar and wind power be considered as firm energy? HPR’s Savannah Harriman-Pote takes a closer look.

Extended segment on The Conversation – September 14, 2022

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Sustainability in the electric vehicle industry through renewable energy sources https://energytower.org/sustainability-in-the-electric-vehicle-industry-through-renewable-energy-sources/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 11:37:36 +0000 https://energytower.org/sustainability-in-the-electric-vehicle-industry-through-renewable-energy-sources/ Varun GoenkaThe electric vehicle industry offers businesses the opportunity to use renewable energy. As organizations wish to be more environmentally conscious in their business operations, electric vehicles are becoming more prevalent and renewable energy is on the rise as it reduces carbon footprints and expands energy supplies. Distributed renewable energy sources play a major role […]]]>

Varun Goenka

The electric vehicle industry offers businesses the opportunity to use renewable energy. As organizations wish to be more environmentally conscious in their business operations, electric vehicles are becoming more prevalent and renewable energy is on the rise as it reduces carbon footprints and expands energy supplies.

Distributed renewable energy sources play a major role in finding sustainable and cost-effective solutions to our way of life. This is particularly useful when access to other energy sources is difficult, due to its wide availability and increased efficiency.

India has the third largest renewable energy generation in the world and its share of renewable energy capacity continues to grow.

As far as the electric vehicle industry is concerned, the use of renewable energy sources can make electric vehicle charging more environmentally friendly and help reduce the cost of electricity. Solar panels are the most easily accessible resource in terms of availability. To promote decentralized solar power plants, the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy has developed draft guidelines for developers. Several electric vehicle charging stations are already taking advantage of this by using solar panels to obtain their own energy.

Not only can you recharge your vehicles with renewable energy, but you can also trade it. Power trading allows charging stations to purchase power from a single source.

The Department of Energy has notified the 2022 Electricity Rules, which will allow small consumers to also buy open-access renewable energy. The ministry opened access to consumers of all scales and reduced the transaction limit from 1 MW to 100 kW.

An open-access, renewable hybrid model that bundles multiple types of power generation or uses more than one type of fuel is the best bet for charging/swapping stations. With a hybrid system, one can increase the amount of adaptable power generation as well as reliability in areas where access to electricity may be difficult.

It is important for the electric vehicle industry to ensure that electric vehicle operations are truly green. This can happen with the reuse and recycling of automotive batteries. Used electric car batteries, for example, are versatile and can also be used for energy storage in homes and industry, rather than in cars.

Lithium-ion batteries used in electric vehicles are large, heavy and contain precious metals like cobalt. However, if not carefully disassembled; they can explode and release hazardous materials.

India does not have a commercial battery recycling system. They are piled up and dumped in landfills without assessment of their environmental impact.

To address this issue, India has established guidelines on battery waste management that require manufacturers to provide recycling facilities for used batteries, thereby imposing extended producer responsibility. Some financial benefits are also provided by the government to stimulate recycling measures.

To make electric vehicles truly sustainable, it is important to look at both sustainable power generation for batteries and charging/exchange stations, as well as developing an efficient battery reuse system. This will ensure that the foundations of sustainability that underpin the electric vehicle ecosystem are enhanced in the years to come.

The author is Varun Goenka, CEO and Co-Founder, Chargeup.

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed are personal and do not reflect the position or official policy of Financial Express Online. Reproduction of this content without permission is prohibited.

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Protests thwart bids to diversify energy sources https://energytower.org/protests-thwart-bids-to-diversify-energy-sources/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 05:11:26 +0000 https://energytower.org/protests-thwart-bids-to-diversify-energy-sources/ It seems that NIMBYism cannot take many forms, even when it comes to providing infrastructure for diverse energy sources. Whether it’s green, clean, or somewhere in between, opponents have successfully derailed or delayed such projects in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine. In Massachusetts, environmentalists have blocked additional pipeline capacity to boost our supply of abundant […]]]>

It seems that NIMBYism cannot take many forms, even when it comes to providing infrastructure for diverse energy sources.

Whether it’s green, clean, or somewhere in between, opponents have successfully derailed or delayed such projects in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine.

In Massachusetts, environmentalists have blocked additional pipeline capacity to boost our supply of abundant natural gas literally on our doorstep.

Ironically, the same scenario has played out in our two northern neighboring states, where efforts to erect power lines to import renewable hydroelectric power from Quebec have been met with similar environmental opposition.

But late last month, Maine’s highest court gave new life to a billion-dollar power line that would bring Canadian hydropower to Massachusetts, ruling that a nationwide vote State rejecting the project was unconstitutional.

The Supreme Court, which determined that the retroactive nature of last year’s referendum violated the project developer’s constitutional rights, sent the case back to a lower court for further consideration.

The project, backed by Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, would be paid for by Bay State taxpayers.

The Baker administration said the hydroelectric project could supply about 17% of state electricity demand and reduce Massachusetts power bills by 2% to 4% each year under contracts already approved by the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities.

However, the SJC has not ruled on a separate case involving a lease for a 1-mile portion of the proposed power line that crosses Maine state land.

While most of Maine’s proposed 145-mile power line would be built along existing corridors, a new 53-mile stretch was needed to reach the Canadian border.

Proponents say projects like this one, funded by Massachusetts taxpayers, are needed to fight climate change and introduce renewable electricity to a region heavily reliant on natural gas, which can lead to price hikes. energy costs.

But critics say the project’s environmental benefits are overstated and not worth the harm done to western Maine’s forests.

It’s essentially the same argument that killed a previous attempt to hook up to Quebec hydroelectricity, New Hampshire’s Northern Pass project.

It proposed to run 192 miles of new power lines from Canada, through northern New Hampshire, south to Concord, then east to Deerfield. The project was a collaboration between Eversource – formerly known as the Public Service of New Hampshire – and Hydro-Québec, owned by the Quebec provincial government.

The utilities said the $1.6 billion venture would transport 1,090 megawatts of electricity from Quebec – which gets more than 90% of its electricity from hydroelectric dams – to the New England power grid.

But this project generated considerable controversy from the start. Many of his most vocal opponents came from the sparsely populated and heavily forested North Country.

In the end, their concerns and those of other conservationists ultimately prevailed.

It seems obvious that hydroelectricity has become Governor Baker’s main source of green electricity. Its virtually non-existent carbon footprint makes it an environmentally attractive way to replace one of the supposed main drivers of climate change, fossil fuels.

However, one of the effects of our seemingly changing climate, prolonged drought, raises questions about the reliability of hydroelectricity.

According to the California Energy Commission, in a typical year, hydropower provides about 15% of the state’s electricity supply.

But during that state’s prolonged drought, that percentage has dropped. Over the past three years, hydroelectricity has fallen by more than half to around 7%.

Could this happen in Quebec? This certainly cannot be ruled out, as no one can accurately predict long-term climate patterns.

With the availability of a renewable energy source tied up in the courts and others – wind, solar – intermittent in nature, we would be wise to recognize that natural gas remains a source of energy we can rely on.

The only constraint to its supply remains the refusal to provide the infrastructure necessary for its delivery.

It seems that NIMBYism has a price, which followers of this practice are more than happy for you to pay.

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Small nuclear reactors as alternative energy sources can be cheaper but also risky https://energytower.org/small-nuclear-reactors-as-alternative-energy-sources-can-be-cheaper-but-also-risky/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 04:37:10 +0000 https://energytower.org/small-nuclear-reactors-as-alternative-energy-sources-can-be-cheaper-but-also-risky/ A worldwide search for alternative sources to Russian power during the war in Ukraine has refocused attention on smaller, easier-to-build nuclear power plants, which proponents say could provide a cheaper and more efficient alternative to mega – older model control units. UK-based Rolls-Royce SMR says its small modular reactors (SMRs) are much cheaper and faster […]]]>

A worldwide search for alternative sources to Russian power during the war in Ukraine has refocused attention on smaller, easier-to-build nuclear power plants, which proponents say could provide a cheaper and more efficient alternative to mega – older model control units.

UK-based Rolls-Royce SMR says its small modular reactors (SMRs) are much cheaper and faster to start than standard power plants, providing the kind of energy security that many countries seek.

France already depends on nuclear power for most of its electricity, and Germany has retained the option of reactivating two nuclear power plants which it will close at the end of the year as Russia cuts its gas supplies natural.

While Rolls-Royce SMR and its competitors have signed deals with countries from Britain to Poland to start building the stations, they are many years away from operating and cannot solve the energy crisis that is hitting currently Europe.

Nuclear energy also presents risks, including disposal of highly radioactive waste and keeping this technology out of the hands of rogue countries or nefarious groups that may pursue a nuclear weapons program.

These risks were heightened after the bombing of Europe’s largest nuclear power plant in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, which raised fears of a potential nuclear disaster.

Due to the war, however, “reliance on gas imports and Russian energy sources has focused people’s attention on energy security,” Rolls-Royce spokesman SMR said. , Dan Gould.

Components of an SMR can be built in a factory, moved to a site in tractor-trailers and assembled there, making the technology more attractive to budget buyers, he said.

“It’s like building Lego,” Mr Gould said. “Building on a smaller scale reduces risk and makes it a more investable project.”

SMRs are essentially pressurized water reactors identical to some 400 reactors around the world. The main advantages are their size – about a tenth the size of a standard reactor – the ease of construction and the price.

The estimated cost of a Rolls-Royce SMR is £2.2 billion to £2.8 billion ($2.5 billion to $3.2 billion), with an estimated build time of five and a half years.

That’s two years faster than it took to build a standard nuclear power plant between 2016 and 2021, according to statistics from the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Some estimates place the cost of building a 1,100 megawatt nuclear power plant at between $6 billion and $9 billion. Rolls-Royce aims to build its first stations in the UK within five-and-a-half years, Mr Gould said.

Similarly, Oklahoma-based NuScale Power signed agreements last year with two Polish companies – copper and silver producer KGHM and energy producer Unimot – to explore the possibility of building SMRs to power heavy industry.

Poland wants to abandon polluting coal-fired electricity production.

Rolls-Royce SMR announced last month that it had signed an agreement with Dutch development company ULC-Energy to consider setting up SMR in the Netherlands.

Another partner is Turkey, where Russia is building the Akkuyu nuclear power plant on the southern coast. Environmentalists say the area is seismically active and could be a target for terrorists.

The introduction of “unproven” nuclear power technology in the form of SMR does not sit well with environmentalists, who argue that the proliferation of small reactors will exacerbate the problem of disposing of highly radioactive nuclear waste.

“Unfortunately, Turkey is governed by an incompetent administration which has turned it into a ‘testing ground’ for business,” said Koray Dogan Urbarli, spokesperson for Turkey’s Green Party.

“It’s giving up sovereignty of a certain region for at least 100 years for Russia to build a nuclear power plant. This incompetence and lobbying power makes Turkey an easy target for SMRs,” Koray said.

His party shuns technology with an “uncertain future”, he said.

Mr Gould said a Rolls-Royce SMR would generate nuclear waste the size of a “tennis court stacked three feet high” throughout the plant’s 60-year lifespan.

He said initially the waste would be stored on site at UK factories and eventually moved to a long-term disposal site selected by the UK government.

Any country acquiring nuclear reactors automatically strengthens its ability to manufacture nuclear weapons. Each SMR could produce about 10 plutonium bombs each year

MV Ramana, professor at the University of British Columbia

MV Ramana, professor of public policy and global affairs at the University of British Columbia, cites research suggesting that there is “no demonstrated way” to ensure that nuclear waste stored in what authorities consider as safe sites will not escape in the future.

The constant heat generated by the waste could alter the rock formations where it is stored and allow water seepage, while future mining activities could compromise the integrity of a nuclear waste site, Ramana said. specialist in international security and nuclear energy.

Skeptics also raise the risks of possibly exporting such technology to politically tumultuous regions.

Mr Gould said Rolls-Royce is ‘fully compliant’ with UK and international requirements by exporting its SMR technology ‘only to territories that are signatories to the international treaties necessary for the peaceful use of nuclear energy for power generation “.

However, Mr Ramana said there was no guarantee nations would follow the rules.

“Any country that acquires nuclear reactors automatically improves its ability to make nuclear weapons,” he said, adding that each SMR could produce “about 10 plutonium bombs every year.”

Rolls-Royce SMR could choose to stop providing fuel and other services to anyone flouting the rules, but “if a country chooses to do so, they can simply tell the International Atomic Energy Agency to stop inspections, as Iran has done, for example”. , Mr. Ramana said.

Although spent fuel normally undergoes chemical reprocessing to generate the type of plutonium used in nuclear weapons, Ramana said this reprocessing technology is widely known and a highly sophisticated reprocessing plant is not needed to produce the amount of plutonium needed for weapons.

Updated: September 11, 2022, 04:30

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Wall Street banks to preserve energy sources in European offices https://energytower.org/wall-street-banks-to-preserve-energy-sources-in-european-offices/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 06:39:02 +0000 https://energytower.org/wall-street-banks-to-preserve-energy-sources-in-european-offices/ Hi. I am Aaron Weinman. Banks on Wall Street – American and European – are literally turning off the taps to conserve power in their European offices, which are preparing for a freezing winter. Companies like JPMorgan and Deutsche Bank are shutting down hot water and drinking fountains to mitigate the impact of the Russian […]]]>

Hi. I am Aaron Weinman. Banks on Wall Street – American and European – are literally turning off the taps to conserve power in their European offices, which are preparing for a freezing winter.

Companies like JPMorgan and Deutsche Bank are shutting down hot water and drinking fountains to mitigate the impact of the Russian government’s decision to stop the flow of gas to Europe via the Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline.

Russia – which was hit with sanctions after President Vladimir Putin opted to invade Ukraine – has said Nord Stream 1 will not reopen until those sanctions are lifted.

JPMorgan’s European offices completed power failure simulationtests that help the bank prepare for a power outage.

The Russian government’s decision to stem the flow of gas to European countries – which are heavily dependent on energy from Russia – is having a ripple effect on various parts of the global economy, from utility bills to currency volatility (stock up on your USD!).

Let’s dig into it.


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Office buildings including the headquarters of Deutsche Bank stand in the downtown financial district on March 7, 2019 in Frankfurt, Germany.


Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images


1. JPMorgan mulls using diesel generators to stay online as banks’ European offices contemplate life without the Nord Stream 1 pipeline. Deutsche Bank is turning off hot water in bathrooms and changing temperatures in its offices.

The German lender is also turning off the fountain and illuminated advertising outside its headquarters in Frankfurt.

Other financial firms, from France’s BNP Paribas to the insurance company Zurich, are also taking steps to preserve energy ahead of the coming winter cold. If things get worse, Zurich could close services like its office gym.

Financial services firms are reacting to Russian energy giant Gazprom’s decision to shut down a crucial pipeline for Europe’s energy sector.

This is the second time in recent months that Gazprom has shut down Nord Stream 1. The pipeline was shut down on August 31 for three days of maintenance.

Despite being brought back online on September 2, it was only operating at 20% capacity. The gas passes through the Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline under the Baltic Sea to Germany. It has historically provided about a third of the gas exported by Russia in Europe.

In Germany, natural gas accounts for around 27% of the country’s consumption. overall energy mix. Before Russia crossed the Ukrainian border, more than half of the gas consumed in Germany was imported from Russia.

Since then, European countries have been scrambling to obtain gas supplies from other countries such as Norway or the Netherlands. Germany has also sought to expand its infrastructure to enable it to import more liquefied natural gas from the United States and Qatar.

As temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere cool in the coming months, European homes and offices will struggle to diversify their energy mix and conserve existing energy sources to ensure homes and businesses stay heated .


In other news:

Kim Kardashian attends the New York City KKW Beauty Launch at ULTA Beauty in 2019.


Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for ULTA Beauty / KKW Beauty


2. Kim Kardashian is teaming up with Jay Sammons, a former partner who ran consumer investing at Carlyle, to start a new private equity firm called SKKY Partners, the Wall Street Journal first reported. SKKY will focus on investing in consumer products, hospitality, luxury goods, digital commerce, media and entertainment companies. The Kardashian reality star, meanwhile, has built a $1.8 billion empire.

3. Broadcom’s $61 billion acquisition of VMWare is poised to expand its cloud efforts. But customers and employees say the deal ruins VMWare’s success. Insider took a deep dive into the frustrations bubbling up in the company’s ecosystem as the takeover progresses.

4. Twitter’s legal battle with Elon Musk has provided a clue as to who manages the billionaire’s fortune. Twitter has subpoenaed Jon Neuhaus, chief executive of Musk’s favorite investment bank, Morgan Stanley. Here is what we know about the wealth advisor. A judge, meanwhile, called the efforts of Musk’s legal team “suboptimal” and attempted his decision to waive due diligence on his original deal to buy Twitter.

5. British cinema operator Cineworld has filed for bankruptcy protection in the USA. The world’s second-largest movie theater chain has $1.94 billion in debt with existing lenders, and it plans to exit Chapter 11 in the first quarter of 2023. PJT Partners is financial advisor to Cineworld, while AlixPartners advises on restructuring. Kirkland & Ellis and Slaughter & May are the cinema operator’s legal advisers.

6. The death of former Bed Bath & Beyond CFO Gustavo Arnal has renewed scrutiny of the struggling retailer. Here’s a look at what led to this critical moment and whether the company will sink or swim from here.

7. Goldman Sachs internships have ended, but interns don’t have job offers (yet), according to efinancialcareers. Interns at the bank’s London office won’t know if they can convert their internships into full-time jobs for a few weeks after the end of the program.

8. Bank of America expects its new back-to-office policies within the next six to eight weeks, Bloomberg reported. The plans will be based on feedback the bank has received from staff surveys, chief executive Brian Moynihan said in a conference on tuesday.

9. Angelina Jolie’s former investment firm is suing Brad Pitt for $250 million. Firm alleges Pitt secretly moved assets and devalued former couple’s joint wine company, Château Miraval.

10. Miren, a fintech that helps lenders assess small business owners, just won a startup grant from Google. Here’s the 16-slide pitch deck the company used to help founder Gabriela Campoverde become a finalist for the David Prize, a $200,000 grant awarded annually to five New Yorkers.


Transactions concluded and removals:

  • Private equity investor Francisco Partners has acquired a majority stake in Kobalt, a music and technology company.
  • Antelope, a pet wellness company owned by Alpine Investors, has purchased Ark Naturals Company, another pet health and wellness brand. Ark will still operate under its brand name.
  • Bank of America has appointed JuliAnn Burkhardt as chief strategy officer for global investment bank, Bloomberg reported. Burkhardt – who joined BofA in 2007 – will succeed Dave Fishman. She was until recently Managing Director of the bank’s retail and retail investment banking division.
  • Truist has hired Hayes Smith to oversee private equity coverage for its investment banking arm, Bloomberg reported. He joined Credit Suisse. The Charlotte-based bank has also hired Chris Cormier to lead its equity capital markets business in technology, media and telecommunications. Cormier joins from UBS.

Organized by Aaron Weinman in New York. Tips? E-mail aweinman@insider.com or tweet @aaronw11.

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Clean energy sources bring hope to the environment – Scot Scoop News https://energytower.org/clean-energy-sources-bring-hope-to-the-environment-scot-scoop-news/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 04:41:15 +0000 https://energytower.org/clean-energy-sources-bring-hope-to-the-environment-scot-scoop-news/ Underground and under pressure for millions of years, plankton and plants decompose into natural gas, oil and coal – fossil fuels. Using coal mining and the drilling of oil and gas wells, these resources are extracted from the Earth and then burned to release energy. Sixty-one percent of the energy used in the United States […]]]>

Underground and under pressure for millions of years, plankton and plants decompose into natural gas, oil and coal – fossil fuels. Using coal mining and the drilling of oil and gas wells, these resources are extracted from the Earth and then burned to release energy.

Sixty-one percent of the energy used in the United States comes from fossil fuels, according to the US Energy Information Administration. Environmental scientists have signaled that the shift to clean energy is more imperative than ever as the devastating impact of fossil fuels becomes ever more apparent and the imminent depletion of materials draws near.

Fossil fuels themselves are not harmful to our environment or public health. It is the process of extraction and burning into energy that contributes to air pollution.

“When fossil fuels are burned, they emit greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide that trap heat in the Earth’s atmosphere and contribute to climate change. In 2019, fossil fuels accounted for 74% of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States,” said Savannah Bertrand, Policy Associate at Institute for Environmental and Energy Studies.

To persist with current rates of fossil fuel burning would continue the average temperature increase, which has adverse effects on human health and global conditions. If the transition to clean energy does not happen quickly, it will be forced in about 30 years when the natural supply of fossil fuels is exhausted, according to the Millennium Alliance for Humanity and the Biosphere.

There are many alternatives to fossil fuels: solar energy, hydroelectric energy, wind energy and, more recently, nuclear energy. The durability of each energy source must be taken into account before use, and their efficiency is also an important element to consider.

The capacity factor of an energy source is the percentage of time throughout the year during which it generates the maximum energy. Nuclear energy has the highest capacity factor. According to Office of Nuclear Energyit had a capacity factor of 92.5% in 2020. After nuclear, geothermal is the second most efficient source, followed by natural gas, hydro, coal, wind and finally solar.

Each energy source has unique advantages, but they also each come with constraints that can greatly impact their production.

Although it is the most efficient, nuclear energy has a negative image in the media and in public opinion because of its radioactive waste and its history of accidents.

“The popular perception of nuclear energy is that it is the most dangerous way to generate electricity. Similar to how people fear airplanes, people irrationally fear nuclear power. Even though planes are among the safest means of transport, when a plane breaks down, it makes headlines,” said Isabelle Boemeke, a nuclear energy activist. “If your only exposure to a technology is its negatives, it makes sense to think of it in those terms. However, when you look at the data, nuclear energy is still one of the safest.

Besides the inaccurate portrayal of nuclear energy as a dangerous source, its radioactive waste is also portrayed in an excessively negative way.

“The radioactivity of nuclear waste means that in theory it could also be used as a source of energy. However, to turn waste into a power plant, it would have to be forced to decompose faster, which is currently not possible. This puts him in a middle ground; it’s not radioactive enough to be useful, but not safe enough to be left alone,” said Ian Hagmann, professor of physics, engineering and green technology at Carlmont High School.

The process of nuclear energy creates radioactive waste, but it is not hazardous to the public. Nuclear power plants are entirely responsible for their waste, so unlike fossil fuels, nuclear power does not contribute to air pollution.

Another relatively new power plant is geothermal electricity. Geothermal energy uses underground reservoirs of steam and hot water to generate electricity or to directly heat and cool buildings.

Although minimal compared to burning fossil fuels, geothermal power plants can emit small amounts of greenhouse gases. Their main drawback, however, is the potential for surface instability; land above geothermal reservoirs can sometimes subside slowly over time and may be linked to earthquakes.

Unlike fossil fuel and nuclear power plants which can be built virtually anywhere, geothermal power plants require tanks which are only found in specific places, usually near the boundaries of tectonic plates or hot spots.

Geothermal energy is not the only source of localized energy. Hydropower, wind power, and solar power all have specific location requirements.

Although hydroelectricity, wind energy and solar energy are considered to be the most renewable sources, according to the US Energy Information Administrationthey are not as reliable as other sources and do not produce enough power to support current consumption.

“What makes nuclear fusion so ideal is that we can control the reaction, which can produce a lot of energy efficiently. If we rely on the capricious sun, water and wind, there can be power shortages. Especially like in California: we’re in a drought, and California’s 10% of hydropower is now going to zero,” Hagmann said.

Ultimately, the biggest barrier to the development of renewable energy are the logistical barriers. According to Hagmann, it is important to focus on what can be done despite these barriers to improve the state of the planet.

“The energy has to come from somewhere. The transition from fossil fuels brings us to nuclear energy, which does not pollute in the same way,” said Hagmann. “Climately, we need to think about the planet urgently, so the focus should be on Earth security.”

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